Wednesday, December 1, 2010


  NOTICE: This product is discontinued. 

What is Little BigShot?

Little BigShot is a macro and bokeh lens for compact cameras.

With this lens, an inexpensive camera can capture macro images comparable to those from a DSLR.

In addition to higher magnification, Little BigShot provides the user with beautiful bokeh and a greater working distance.



Using Little BigShot for Higher Magnification
Simply use zoom in conjunction with the LBS lens for the desired level of magnification.




















Using Little BigShot to Enhance the Bokeh Effect
Adding the LBS lens to the camera immediately decreases the depth of field, giving your photos DSLR-style bokeh.  You are then able to manipulate and enhance the bokeh effect by making adjustments to the zoom level.






How It Works 
Select your desired zoom level, move the camera closer and further until perfect focus appears in the monitor and take the shot.  It's that easy, as this video demonstrates.





LBS Lenses Are Available in Sizes to Fit All Compact Cameras


Will It Fit?
The LBS lens is designed for pocket compacts and super zooms, so if your camera looks like one of the examples below with a telescoping lens and a flat surface on the front of the lens, then your camera can take the LBS lens.  If your camera is a bridge camera, the LBS lens only works with Canon bridges with ring adaptors to attach the LBS lens to a UV filter.






Message to Customers
Macro photography is a captivating, consuming hobby.  While shooting closeup photos of tiny natural wonders, the world temporarily consists of yourself, your camera, your subjects and nothing else.

Macro photography allows us to perceive our world on a different level than we can with the naked eye.  Small objects become entire landscapes in a macro.

With this product,  you're able to slide a compact camera out of your shirt pocket and instantly capture a scene of natural wonder at high magnification.


Simplicity, ease and affordability are the basis of the LBS concept.

Regards to All,
David Runyan